dcsimg
 

ANOVA

Blog posts and articles with tips for doing ANOVA (Analysis of Variance), especially for quality improvement initiatives.

Dear Readers, As 2016 comes to a close, it’s time to reflect on the passage of time and changes. As I’m sure you’ve guessed, I love statistics and analyzing data! I also love talking and writing about it. In fact, I’ve been writing statistical blog posts for over five years, and it’s been an absolute blast. John Tukey, the renowned statistician, once said, “The best thing about being a statistician... Continue Reading
In Part 1 of this blog series, I wrote about how statistical inference uses data from a sample of individuals to reach conclusions about the whole population. That’s a very powerful tool, but you must check your assumptions when you make statistical inferences. Violating any of these assumptions can result in false positives or false negatives, thus invalidating your results.  The common data... Continue Reading

7 Deadly Statistical Sins Even the Experts Make

Do you know how to avoid them?

Get the facts >
Statistical inference uses data from a sample of individuals to reach conclusions about the whole population. It’s a very powerful tool. But as the saying goes, “With great power comes great responsibility!” When attempting to make inferences from sample data, you must check your assumptions. Violating any of these assumptions can result in false positives or false negatives, thus invalidating... Continue Reading
Every day, thousands of people withdraw extra cash for daily expenses. Each transaction may be small, but the total amount of cash dispersed over hundreds or thousands of daily transactions can be very high. But every bank branch has a fixed cash flow, which must be set without knowing what each customer will need on a given day. This creates a challenge for financial entities. Customers expect... Continue Reading
Since the release of Minitab Express in 2014, we’ve often received questions in technical support about the differences between Express and Minitab 17.  In this post, I’ll attempt to provide a comparison between these two Minitab products. What Is Minitab 17? Minitab 17 is an all-in-one graphical and statistical analysis package that includes basic analysis tools such as hypothesis testing,... Continue Reading
Face it, you love regression analysis as much as I do. Regression is one of the most satisfying analyses in Minitab: get some predictors that should have a relationship to a response, go through a model selection process, interpret fit statistics like adjusted R2 and predicted R2, and make predictions. Yes, regression really is quite wonderful. Except when it’s not. Dark, seedy corners of the data... Continue Reading
Today, September 16, is World Ozone Day. You don't hear much about the ozone layer any more. In fact, if you’re under 30, you might think this is just another trivial, obscure observance, along the lines of International Dot Day (yesterday) or National Apple Dumpling Day (tomorrow). But there’s a good reason that, almost 30 years ago, the United Nations designated today to as a day to raise... Continue Reading
If you’re in the market for statistical software, there are many considerations and more than a few options for you to evaluate. Check out these seven questions to ask yourself before choosing statistical software—your answers should help guide you towards the best solution for your needs! 1. Who uses statistical software in your organization? Are they expert statisticians, novices, or a mix of both?... Continue Reading
In 2011 we had solar panels fitted on our property. In the last few months we have noticed a few problems with the inverter (the equipment that converts the electricity generated by the panels from DC to AC, and manages the transfer of unused electric to the power company). It was shutting down at various times throughout the day, typically when it was very sunny, resulting in no electricity being... Continue Reading
In regression, "sums of squares" are used to represent variation. In this post, we’ll use some sample data to walk through these calculations. The sample data used in this post is available within Minitab by choosing Help > Sample Data, or File > Open Worksheet > Look in Minitab Sample Data folder (depending on your version of Minitab).  The dataset is called ResearcherSalary.MTW, and contains data... Continue Reading
Earlier this month, PLOS.org published an article titled "Ten Simple Rules for Effective Statistical Practice." The 10 rules are good reading for anyone who draws conclusions and makes decisions based on data, whether you're trying to extend the boundaries of scientific knowledge or make good decisions for your business.  Carnegie Mellon University's Robert E. Kass and several co-authors devised... Continue Reading
Suppose you’ve collected data on cycle time, revenue, the dimension of a manufactured part, or some other metric that’s important to you, and you want to see what other variables may be related to it. Now what? When I graduated from college with my first statistics degree, my diploma was bona fide proof that I'd endured hours and hours of classroom lectures on various statistical topics, including l... Continue Reading
Analysis of variance (ANOVA) can determine whether the means of three or more groups are different. ANOVA uses F-tests to statistically test the equality of means. In this post, I’ll show you how ANOVA and F-tests work using a one-way ANOVA example. But wait a minute...have you ever stopped to wonder why you’d use an analysis of variance to determine whether means are different? I'll also show how... Continue Reading
by Laerte de Araujo Lima, guest blogger The NBA's 2015-16 season will be one for the history books. Not only was it the last season of Kobe Bryan, who scored 60 points in his final game, but the Golden State Warriors set a new wins record, beating the previous record set by 1995-96 Chicago Bulls. The Warriors seem likely to take this season's NBA title, in large part thanks to the performance of... Continue Reading
T-tests are handy hypothesis tests in statistics when you want to compare means. You can compare a sample mean to a hypothesized or target value using a one-sample t-test. You can compare the means of two groups with a two-sample t-test. If you have two groups with paired observations (e.g., before and after measurements), use the paired t-test. How do t-tests work? How do t-values fit in? In this... Continue Reading
Mind the gap. It's is an important concept to bear in mind whilst traveling on the Tube in London, the T in Boston, the Metro in Washington, D.C., etc. But how many of us remember to mind the gap when we create an interval plot in Minitab Statistical Software? Not too many of us, I'd wager. And it's a shame, too. When you travel on the subway, minding the gap means giving thoughtful consideration... Continue Reading
What is an interaction? It’s when the effect of one factor depends on the level of another factor. Interactions are important when you’re performing ANOVA, DOE, or a regression analysis. Without them, your model may be missing an important term that helps explain variability in the response! For example, let’s consider 3-point shooting in the NBA. We previously saw that the number of 3-point... Continue Reading
In my last post, I looked at viewership data for the five seasons of HBO’s hit series Game of Thrones. I created a time series plot in Minitab that showed how viewership rose season by season, and how it varied episode by episode within each season.   My next step is to fit a statistical model to the data, which I hope will allow me to predict the viewing numbers for future episodes.    I am going to... Continue Reading
In this post, I’ll address some common questions we’ve received in technical support about the difference between fitted and data means, where to find each option within Minitab, and how Minitab calculates each. First, let’s look at some definitions. It’s useful to have an example, so I’ll be using the Light Output data set from Minitab’s Data Set Library, which includes a description of the sample... Continue Reading
In the world of linear models, a hierarchical model contains all lower-order terms that comprise the higher-order terms that also appear in the model. For example, a model that includes the interaction term A*B*C is hierarchical if it includes these terms: A, B, C, A*B, A*C, and B*C. Fitting the correct regression model can be as much of an art as it is a science. Consequently, there's not always a... Continue Reading