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Data Analysis Software

Blog posts and articles with tips for using statistical software to analyze data for quality improvement.

by Laerte de Araujo Lima, guest blogger The NBA's 2015-16 season will be one for the history books. Not only was it the last season of Kobe Bryan, who scored 60 points in his final game, but the Golden State Warriors set a new wins record, beating the previous record set by 1995-96 Chicago Bulls. The Warriors seem likely to take this season's NBA title, in large part thanks to the performance of... Continue Reading
We often receive questions about moving ranges because they're used in various tools in our statistical software, including control charts and capability analysis when data is not collected in subgroups. In this post, I'll explain what a moving range is, and how a moving range and average moving range are calculated. A moving range measures how variation changes over time when data are collected as... Continue Reading

7 Deadly Statistical Sins Even the Experts Make

Do you know how to avoid them?

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As a recent graduate from Arizona State University with a degree in Business Statistics, I had the opportunity to work with students from different areas of study and help analyze data from various projects for them. One particular group asked for help analyzing online survey data they had gathered from other students, and they wanted to see if their new student program was beneficial. I would... Continue Reading
Getting your data from Excel into Minitab Statistical Software for analysis is easy, especially if you keep the following tips in mind. Copy and Paste To paste into Minitab, you can either right-click in the worksheet and choose Paste Cells or you can use Control-V. Minitab allows for 1 row of column headers, so if you have a single row of column info (or no column header info), then you can quickly... Continue Reading
T-tests are handy hypothesis tests in statistics when you want to compare means. You can compare a sample mean to a hypothesized or target value using a one-sample t-test. You can compare the means of two groups with a two-sample t-test. If you have two groups with paired observations (e.g., before and after measurements), use the paired t-test. How do t-tests work? How do t-values fit in? In this... Continue Reading
Five-point Likert scales are commonly associated with surveys and are used in a wide variety of settings. You’ve run into the Likert scale if you’ve ever been asked whether you strongly agree, agree, neither agree or disagree, disagree, or strongly disagree about something. The worksheet to the right shows what five-point Likert data look like when you have two groups. Because Likert item data are... Continue Reading
Most of us have heard a backwards way of completing a task, or doing something in the conventionally wrong order, described as “putting the cart before the horse.” That’s because a horse pulling a cart is much more efficient than a horse pushing a cart. This saying may be especially true in the world of statistics. Focusing on a statistical tool or analysis before checking out the condition of your... Continue Reading
Leading and trailing spaces in a data set are like termites in your house. If you don’t realize they are there and you don’t get rid of them, they’re going to wreak havoc. Here are a few easy ways to remove these pesky characters with Minitab Statistical Software prior to analysis. Data Import If you’re importing data from Excel, a text file, or some other file type: Choose File > Open and select your... Continue Reading
When you analyze a Gage R&R study in statistical software, your results can be overwhelming. There are a lot of statistics listed in Minitab's Session Window—what do they all mean, and are they telling you the same thing? If you don't know where to start, it can be hard to figure out what the analysis is telling you, especially if your measurement system is giving you some numbers you'd think are... Continue Reading
After my husband’s most recent visit to the dentist, he returned home cavity-free...and with a $150 electric toothbrush in hand.  I wanted details. It began innocently. His dreaded trip to the dentist ended in high praise for no cavities and only a warning to floss more. That prompted my programming-and-automation-obsessed husband, still in the chair, to exclaim, "I wish there was a way to automate... Continue Reading
I’ve written about R-squared before and I’ve concluded that it’s not as intuitive as it seems at first glance. It can be a misleading statistic because a high R-squared is not always good and a low R-squared is not always bad. I’ve even said that R-squared is overrated and that the standard error of the estimate (S) can be more useful. Even though I haven’t always been enthusiastic about... Continue Reading
Mind the gap. It's is an important concept to bear in mind whilst traveling on the Tube in London, the T in Boston, the Metro in Washington, D.C., etc. But how many of us remember to mind the gap when we create an interval plot in Minitab Statistical Software? Not too many of us, I'd wager. And it's a shame, too. When you travel on the subway, minding the gap means giving thoughtful consideration... Continue Reading
When I wrote How to Calculate B10 Life with Statistical Software, I promised a follow-up blog post that would describe how to compute any “BX” lifetime. In this post I’ll follow through on that promise, and in a third blog post in this series, I will explain why BX life is one of the best measures you can use in your reliability analysis. As a refresher, B10 life refers to the time at which 10% of... Continue Reading
If you follow the news in the United States then you’ve heard that there’s a water crisis in Flint, Michigan. Although there’s going to continue to be debate about how much ethics played a role in the data collection practices, it’s worthwhile to at least be ready to perform the correct analysis on the data when you have it. Here’s how you can use Minitab to be like a citizen data scientist... Continue Reading
If you perform linear regression analysis, you might need to compare different regression lines to see if their constants and slope coefficients are different. Imagine there is an established relationship between X and Y. Now, suppose you want to determine whether that relationship has changed. Perhaps there is a new context, process, or some other qualitative change, and you want to determine... Continue Reading
Many of us have data stored in a database or file that we need to analyze on a regular basis. If you're in that situation and you're using Minitab Statistical Software, here's how you can save some time and effort by automating the process. When you're finished, instead of using File > Query Database (ODBC) each time you want to perform analysis on the most up-to-date set of data, you can add a... Continue Reading
Not long ago, I couldn’t abide statistics. I did respect it, but in much the same way a gazelle respects a lion. Most of my early experiences with statistics indicated that close encounters resulted in pain, so I avoided further contact whenever possible. So how is it that today I write about statistics? That’s simple: it merely required completely reinventing the way I thought about and approached... Continue Reading
There was a lot at stake in the final week of Big Ten play this week. Three different games had an impact on not only the Big Ten Championship Game, but the College Football playoff as well. Unfortunately for the viewers, none of the games were really close in the 4th quarter. But that doesn't mean we can't analyze the 4th down decisions in the first 3 quarters and see whether the losing teams had... Continue Reading
This past weekend in the Big Ten showed how being conservative on 4th down decisions can cost you a game. Ohio State punted on 4th and 1 three different times, while Penn State and Illinois both kicked field goals in the 4th quarter when they needed a touchdown to tie or take the lead. All three teams lost. Perhaps taking some advice from the 4th down calculator would have greatly benefited them! If... Continue Reading
Back when I was an undergrad in statistics, I unfortunately spent an entire semester of my life taking a class, diligently crunching numbers with my TI-82, before realizing 1) that I was actually in an Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) class, 2) why I would want to use such a tool in the first place, and 3) that ANOVA doesn’t necessarily tell you a thing about variances. Fortunately, I've had a lot more... Continue Reading