dcsimg
 

Data Analysis Software

Blog posts and articles with tips for using statistical software to analyze data for quality improvement.

by Lion "Ari" Ondiappan Arivazhagan, guest blogger.   Predicting project completion times is one of the major challenges project managers face. Project schedule overruns are quite common due to the high uncertainty in estimating the amount of time activities require, a lack of historical data about project completion, organizational culture, inadequate skills, the complex and elaborative nature of... Continue Reading
I always knew I was different. Even as a kid. “Is that me? Way out there in left field?” I asked the doc. “Yes,” he nodded, as he looked at my chart. “I used brushing to identify you on the graph.” I wasn’t sure I liked getting brushed. It felt like my true identify was being detected and displayed in a window for all to see. The doctor must have sensed my discomfort. “It’s not uncommon—even for those... Continue Reading
Our vacation planning has begun. My daughter has requested a trip to Disney World as her high school graduation present. For most people, trip planning might mean a simple phone call to the local travel agent or an even simpler do-it-yourself online booking. Not for me. As a statistician, a request like this means I’ve got a lot of data analysis ahead. So many travel questions require (in my... Continue Reading
Welcome to the Hypothesis Test Casino! The featured game of the house is roulette. But this is no ordinary game of roulette. This is p-value roulette! Here’s how it works: We have two roulette wheels, the Null wheel and the Alternative wheel. Each wheel has 20 slots (instead of the usual 37 or 38). You get to bet on one slot. What happens if the ball lands in the slot you bet on? Well, that depends... Continue Reading
In England, with only a few months left, the Barclay’s Premier League is about to enter the final run in to finish up the season. While the top two spots seem pretty locked up with Chelsea and Manchester City showing their class, the fight for the other two spots in the coveted top 4 promises to entertain to the very last weekend. This is key, because only the top 4 finishers qualify for next... Continue Reading
by Lion "Ari" Ondiappan Arivazhagan, guest blogger.  An alarming number of borewell accidents, especially involving little children, have occurred across India in the recent past. This is the second of a series of articles on Borewell accidents in India. In the first installment of the series, I used the G-chart in Minitab Statistical Software to predict the probabilities of innocent children... Continue Reading
In my previous post, I showed you how to set up data collection for a gage R&R analysis using the Assistant in Minitab 17. In this case, the goal of the gage R&R study is to test whether a new tool provides an effective metric for assessing resident supervision in a medical facility.   As noted in that post, I'm drawing on one of my favorite bloggers about health care quality, David Kashmer of the... Continue Reading
One of my favorite bloggers about the application of statistics in health care is David Kashmer, an MD and MBA who runs and writes for the Business Model Innovation in Surgery blog. If you have an interest in how quality improvement methods like Lean and Six Sigma can be applied to healthcare, check it out.  A while back, Dr. Kashmer penned a column called "How to Measure a Process When There's... Continue Reading
It’s safe to say that most people who use statistics are more familiar with parametric analyses than nonparametric analyses. Nonparametric tests are also called distribution-free tests because they don’t assume that your data follow a specific distribution. You may have heard that you should use nonparametric tests when your data don’t meet the assumptions of the parametric test, especially the... Continue Reading
By Peter Olejnik, guest blogger. Previous posts on the Minitab Blog have discussed the work of the Six Sigma students at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology to reduce the quantities of recyclables that wind up in the trash. Led by Dr. Diane Evans, these students continue to make an important impact on their community. As with any Six Sigma process, the results of the work need to be evaluated. A... Continue Reading
I left off last with a post outlining how the Six Sigma students at Rose-Hulman were working on a project to reduce the amount of recycling thrown in the normal trash cans in all of the academic buildings at the institution. Using the DMAIC methodology for completing improvement projects, they had already defined the problem at hand: how could the amount of recycling that’s thrown in the normal trash... Continue Reading
If you wanted to figure out the probability that your favorite football team will win their next game, how would you do it?  My colleague Eduardo Santiago and I recently looked at this question, and in this post we'll share how we approached the solution. Let’s start by breaking down this problem: There are only two possible outcomes: your favorite team wins, or they lose. Ties are a possibility,... Continue Reading
The Minitab Fan section of the Minitab blog is your chance to share with our readers! We always love to hear how you are using Minitab products for quality improvement projects, Lean Six Sigma initiatives, research and data analysis, and more. If our software has helped you, please share your Minitab story, too! My LSS coach suggested that I regularly conduct data analysis to refresh my Minitab... Continue Reading
As someone who has collected and analyzed real data for a living, the idea of using simulated data for a Monte Carlo simulation sounds a bit odd. How can you improve a real product with simulated data? In this post, I’ll help you understand the methods behind Monte Carlo simulation and walk you through a simulation example using Devize. What is Devize, you ask? Devize is Minitab's exciting new,... Continue Reading
There’s no shortage of interest this week in whether Tom Brady is the best quarterback to ever play the game of football. As a University of Tennessee alum, I have to recuse myself from that particular debate for lack of objectivity. (Everyone knows Peyton Manning is the best quarterback to ever play the game, right?) But now seems like a good time to look at some numbers that show where Brady... Continue Reading
by Matthew Barsalou, guest blogger.  E. E. Doc Smith, one of the greatest authors ever, wrote many classic books such as The Skylark of Space and his Lensman series. Doc Smith’s imagination knew no limits; his Galactic Patrol had millions of combat fleets under its command and possessed planets turned into movable, armored weapons platforms. Some of the Galactic Patrol’s weapons may be well... Continue Reading
In my recent meetings with people from various companies in the service industries, I realized that one of the problems they face is that they were collecting large amounts of "qualitative" data: types of product, customer profiles, different subsidiaries, several customer requirements, etc. As I discussed in my previous post, one way to look at qualitative data is to use different types of... Continue Reading
Choosing the correct linear regression model can be difficult. After all, the world and how it works is complex. Trying to model it with only a sample doesn’t make it any easier. In this post, I'll review some common statistical methods for selecting models, complications you may face, and provide some practical advice for choosing the best regression model. It starts when a researcher wants to... Continue Reading
Last Friday I had an interesting tweet come across my Twitter feed. And that was before the Patriots failed to cover their first playoff game of 2015 against the Ravens. When you include that, the record becomes 3-11, good for a winning percentage of only 21%! With the Patriots set to play another playoff game against the Colts, it seems like the smart thing to do is to bet the Colts to cover. But... Continue Reading
by Matthew Barsalou, guest blogger Recently Minitab’s Joel Smith posted a blog about an incident in which he was pooped on by a bird. Twice. I suspect many people would assume the odds of it happening twice are very low, so they would incorrectly assume they are safer after such a rare event happens. I don’t have data on how often birds poop on one person, and I assume Joel is unwilling to stand... Continue Reading