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Design of Experiments

Blog posts and articles about the the statistical method called Design of Experiments in quality improvement.

The Six Sigma quality improvement methodology has lasted for decades because it gets results. Companies in every country around the world, and in every industry, have used this logical, step-by-step method to improve the quality of their processes, products, and services. And they've saved billions of dollars along the way. However, Six Sigma involves a good deal of statistics and data analysis,... Continue Reading
For a process improvement practitioner, finishing the Control Phase of the DMAIC process is your ticket to move on to your next project. You’ve done an excellent job leading the project team because they identified root causes, developed and implemented solutions to resolve those root causes, put a control plan in place and transitioned the process back to the Process Owner. Soon, however, you... Continue Reading

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It's a very exciting time at Minitab's offices around the world because we've just announced the availability of Minitab® 18 Statistical Software. Data is everywhere today, but to use it to make sound, strategic business decisions, you need to have tools that turn that data into knowledge and insights. We've designed Minitab 18 to do exactly that.  We've incorporated a lot of new features, made some... Continue Reading
As someone who has collected and analyzed real data for a living, the idea of using simulated data for a Monte Carlo simulation sounds a bit odd. How can you improve a real product with simulated data? In this post, I’ll help you understand the methods behind Monte Carlo simulation and walk you through a simulation example using Companion by Minitab. Companion by Minitab is a software platform that... Continue Reading
In Parts 1 and 2 of Gauging Gage we looked at the numbers of parts, operators, and replicates used in a Gage R&R Study and how accurately we could estimate %Contribution based on the choice for each.  In doing so, I hoped to provide you with valuable and interesting information, but mostly I hoped to make you like me.  I mean like me so much that if I told you that you were doing... Continue Reading
In Part 1 of Gauging Gage, I looked at how adequate a sampling of 10 parts is for a Gage R&R Study and providing some advice based on the results. Now I want to turn my attention to the other two factors in the standard Gage experiment: 3 operators and 2 replicates.  Specifically, what if instead of increasing the number of parts in the experiment (my previous post demonstrated you would need... Continue Reading
Right now I’m enjoying my daily dose of morning joe. As the steam rises off the cup, the dark rich liquid triggers a powerful enzyme cascade that jump-starts my brain and central nervous system, delivering potent glints of perspicacity into the dark crevices of my still-dormant consciousness. Feels good, yeah! But is it good for me? Let’s see what the studies say… Drinking more than 4 cups of coffee... Continue Reading
As a person who loves baking (and eating) cakes, I find it bothersome to go through all the effort of baking a cake when the end result is too dry for my taste. For that reason, I decided to use a designed experiment in Minitab to help me reduce the moisture loss in baked chocolate cakes, and find the optimal settings of my input factors to produce a moist baked chocolate cake. I’ll share the... Continue Reading
Genichi Taguchi is famous for his pioneering methods of robust quality engineering. One of the major contributions that he made to quality improvement methods is Taguchi designs. Designed experiments were first used by agronomists during the last century. This method seemed highly theoretical at first, and was initially restricted to agronomy. Taguchi made the designed experiment approach more... Continue Reading
Process validation is vital to the success of companies that manufacture drugs and biological products for people and animals. According to the FDA guidelines published by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: “Process validation is defined as the collection and evaluation of data, from the process design state through commercial production, which establishes scientific evidence that a... Continue Reading
Dear Readers, As 2016 comes to a close, it’s time to reflect on the passage of time and changes. As I’m sure you’ve guessed, I love statistics and analyzing data! I also love talking and writing about it. In fact, I’ve been writing statistical blog posts for over five years, and it’s been an absolute blast. John Tukey, the renowned statistician, once said, “The best thing about being a statistician... Continue Reading
If your work involves quality improvement, you've at least heard of Design of Experiments (DOE). You probably know it's the most efficient way to optimize and improve your process. But many of us find DOE intimidating, especially if it's not a tool we use often. How do you select an appropriate design, and ensure you've got the right number of factors and levels? And after you've gathered your... Continue Reading
Since the release of Minitab Express in 2014, we’ve often received questions in technical support about the differences between Express and Minitab 17.  In this post, I’ll attempt to provide a comparison between these two Minitab products. What Is Minitab 17? Minitab 17 is an all-in-one graphical and statistical analysis package that includes basic analysis tools such as hypothesis testing,... Continue Reading
We’ve got a plethora of case studies showing how businesses from different industries solve problems and implement solutions with data analysis. Take a look for ideas about how you can use data analysis to ensure excellence at your business! Boston Scientific, one of the world’s leading developers of medical devices, is just one organization who has shared their story. A team at their Heredia,... Continue Reading
You’ve performed multiple linear regression and have settled on a model which contains several predictor variables that are statistically significant. At this point, it’s common to ask, “Which variable is most important?” This question is more complicated than it first appears. For one thing, how you define “most important” often depends on your subject area and goals. For another, how you collect... Continue Reading
The college football season is here, and this raises a very important question: Is Alabama going to be undefeated when they win the national championship, or will they lose a regular-season game along the way? Okay, so it's not a given that Alabama is going to win the championship this year, but when you've won 4 of the last 7 you're definitely the odds-on favorite. However, what if we wanted to take... Continue Reading
If you’re in the market for statistical software, there are many considerations and more than a few options for you to evaluate. Check out these seven questions to ask yourself before choosing statistical software—your answers should help guide you towards the best solution for your needs! 1. Who uses statistical software in your organization? Are they expert statisticians, novices, or a mix of both?... Continue Reading
Design of Experiments (DOE) is the perfect tool to efficiently determine if key inputs are related to key outputs. Behind the scenes, DOE is simply a regression analysis. What’s not simple, however, is all of the choices you have to make when planning your experiment. What X’s should you test? What ranges should you select for your X’s? How many replicates should you use? Do you need center... Continue Reading
Design of Experiments is an extremely powerful statistical method, and we added a DOE tool to the Assistant in Minitab to make it more accessible to more people. Since it's summer grilling season, I'm applying the Assistant's DOE tool to outdoor cooking. Earlier, I showed you how to set up a designed experiment that will let you optimize how you grill steaks.  If you're not already using it and you... Continue Reading
Design of Experiments (DOE) has a reputation for difficulty, and to an extent, this statistical method deserves that reputation. While it's easy to grasp the basic idea—acquire the maximum amount of information from the fewest number of experimental runs—practical application of this tool can quickly become very confusing.  Even if you're a long-time user of designed experiments, it's still easy to... Continue Reading