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Gage R&R

Blog posts and articles about Gage Repeatability and Reprodicibility (Gage R&R) studies for quality improvement.

In Parts 1 and 2 of this blog series, I wrote about how statistical inference uses data from a sample of individuals to reach conclusions about the whole population. That’s a very powerful tool, but you must check your assumptions when you make statistical inferences. Violating any of these assumptions can result in false positives or false negatives, thus invalidating your results.  The common... Continue Reading
Since the release of Minitab Express in 2014, we’ve often received questions in technical support about the differences between Express and Minitab 17.  In this post, I’ll attempt to provide a comparison between these two Minitab products. What Is Minitab 17? Minitab 17 is an all-in-one graphical and statistical analysis package that includes basic analysis tools such as hypothesis testing,... Continue Reading

7 Deadly Statistical Sins Even the Experts Make

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The ultimate goal of most quality improvement projects is clear: reducing the number of defects, improving a response, or making a change that benefits your customers. We often want to jump right in and start gathering and analyzing data so we can solve the problems. Checking your measurement systems first, with methods like attribute agreement analysis or Gage R&R, may seem like a needless waste... Continue Reading
Earlier this month, PLOS.org published an article titled "Ten Simple Rules for Effective Statistical Practice." The 10 rules are good reading for anyone who draws conclusions and makes decisions based on data, whether you're trying to extend the boundaries of scientific knowledge or make good decisions for your business.  Carnegie Mellon University's Robert E. Kass and several co-authors devised... Continue Reading
Most of us have heard a backwards way of completing a task, or doing something in the conventionally wrong order, described as “putting the cart before the horse.” That’s because a horse pulling a cart is much more efficient than a horse pushing a cart. This saying may be especially true in the world of statistics. Focusing on a statistical tool or analysis before checking out the condition of your... Continue Reading
When you analyze a Gage R&R study in statistical software, your results can be overwhelming. There are a lot of statistics listed in Minitab's Session Window—what do they all mean, and are they telling you the same thing? If you don't know where to start, it can be hard to figure out what the analysis is telling you, especially if your measurement system is giving you some numbers you'd think are... Continue Reading
In previous posts, I discussed the results of a recycling project done by Six Sigma students at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology last spring. (If you’re playing catch up, you can read Part I and Part II.) The students did an awesome job reducing the amount of recycling that was thrown into the normal trash cans across all of the institution’s academic buildings. At the end of the spring... Continue Reading
Before cutting an expensive piece of granite for a countertop, a good carpenter will first confirm he has measured correctly. Acting on faulty measurements could be costly. While no measurement system is perfect, we rely on such systems to quantify data that help us control quality and monitor changes in critical processes. So, how do you know whether the changes you see are valid and not just the... Continue Reading
In my previous post, I showed you how to set up data collection for a gage R&R analysis using the Assistant in Minitab 17. In this case, the goal of the gage R&R study is to test whether a new tool provides an effective metric for assessing resident supervision in a medical facility.   As noted in that post, I'm drawing on one of my favorite bloggers about health care quality, David Kashmer of the... Continue Reading
One of my favorite bloggers about the application of statistics in health care is David Kashmer, an MD and MBA who runs and writes for the Business Model Innovation in Surgery blog. If you have an interest in how quality improvement methods like Lean and Six Sigma can be applied to healthcare, check it out.  A while back, Dr. Kashmer penned a column called "How to Measure a Process When There's... Continue Reading
In technical support, we often receive questions about Gage R&R and how Minitab calculates the amount of variation that is attributable to the various sources in a measurement system. This post will focus on how the variance components are calculated for a crossed Gage R&R using the ANOVA table, and how we can obtain the %Contribution, StdDev, Study Var and %Study Var shown in the Gage R&R output. ... Continue Reading
Last week, thanks to the collective effort from many people, we held very successful events in Guadalajara and Mexico City, which gave us a unique opportunity to meet with over 300 Spanish-speaking Minitab users. They represented many different industries, including automotive, textile, pharmaceutical, medical devices, oil and gas, electronics, and mining, as well as academic institutions and... Continue Reading
by Lion "Ari" Ondiappan Arivazhagan, guest blogger In India, we've seen this story far too many times in recent years: Timmanna Hatti, a six-year old boy, was trapped in a 160-feet borewell for more than 5 days in Sulikeri village of Bagalkot district in Karnataka after falling into the well. Perhaps the most heartbreaking aspect of the situation was the decision of the Bagalkot district... Continue Reading
We cannot improve what we cannot measure. Therefore, it is critical that we conduct a measurement systems analysis (MSA) before we start analyzing our data to make any kind of decisions. When conducting an MSA for continuous measurements, we typically using a Gage R&R Study. And in these Gage R&R Studies, we look at output such as the percentage study variation (%Study Var, or %SV) and the Number... Continue Reading
In Parts 1 and 2 of Gauging Gage we looked at the numbers of parts, operators, and replicates used in a Gage R&R Study and how accurately we could estimate %Contribution based on the choice for each.  In doing so, I hoped to provide you with valuable and interesting information, but mostly I hoped to make you like me.  I mean like me so much that if I told you that you were doing... Continue Reading
In Part 1 of Gauging Gage, I looked at how adequate a sampling of 10 parts is for a Gage R&R Study and providing some advice based on the results. Now I want to turn my attention to the other two factors in the standard Gage experiment: 3 operators and 2 replicates.  Specifically, what if instead of increasing the number of parts in the experiment (my previous post demonstrated you would need... Continue Reading
"You take 10 parts and have 3 operators measure each 2 times." This standard approach to a Gage R&R experiment is so common, so accepted, so ubiquitous that few people ever question whether it is effective.  Obviously one could look at whether 3 is an adequate number of operators or 2 an adequate number of replicates, but in this first of a series of posts about "Gauging Gage," I want to look at... Continue Reading
Using data analysis and statistics to improve business quality has a long history. But it often seems like most of that history involves huge operations. After all, Six Sigma originated with Motorola, and became adopted by thousands of other businesses after it was adopted by a little-known outfit called General Electric. There are many case studies and examples of how big companies used Six Sigma... Continue Reading
Everyone loves Minitab’s Assistant. My favorite bit, as I’ve shown with the Gage R&R Study, is the way that the Assistant puts all the results you need into reports that are easy to understand and present. But it’s also pretty neat that before you ever choose what to do in Minitab, the Assistant is ready to help you. Let’s take a closer look at the Assistant's Graphical Analysis tools. Help Me... Continue Reading
Recently, a customer called our Technical Support team about a Design of Experiment he was performing in Minitab Statistical Software. After they helped to answer his question, the researcher pointed our team to an interesting DOE he and his colleagues conducted that involved using nasal casts to predict the drug delivery of nasal spray. The study has already been published, and you can read... Continue Reading