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Linear Regression

Blog posts and articles about the statistical method called Linear Regression and its use in real-world quality projects.

Dear Readers, As 2016 comes to a close, it’s time to reflect on the passage of time and changes. As I’m sure you’ve guessed, I love statistics and analyzing data! I also love talking and writing about it. In fact, I’ve been writing statistical blog posts for over five years, and it’s been an absolute blast. John Tukey, the renowned statistician, once said, “The best thing about being a statistician... Continue Reading
by Matt Barsalou, guest blogger I know that Thanksgiving is always on the last Thursday in November, but somehow I failed to notice it was fast approaching until the Monday before Thanksgiving. This led to frantically sending a last-minute invitation, and a hunt for a turkey. I live in Germany and this greatly complicated the matter. Not only is Thanksgiving not celebrated, but also actual turkeys... Continue Reading

7 Deadly Statistical Sins Even the Experts Make

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Since the release of Minitab Express in 2014, we’ve often received questions in technical support about the differences between Express and Minitab 17.  In this post, I’ll attempt to provide a comparison between these two Minitab products. What Is Minitab 17? Minitab 17 is an all-in-one graphical and statistical analysis package that includes basic analysis tools such as hypothesis testing,... Continue Reading
Face it, you love regression analysis as much as I do. Regression is one of the most satisfying analyses in Minitab: get some predictors that should have a relationship to a response, go through a model selection process, interpret fit statistics like adjusted R2 and predicted R2, and make predictions. Yes, regression really is quite wonderful. Except when it’s not. Dark, seedy corners of the data... Continue Reading
You’ve performed multiple linear regression and have settled on a model which contains several predictor variables that are statistically significant. At this point, it’s common to ask, “Which variable is most important?” This question is more complicated than it first appears. For one thing, how you define “most important” often depends on your subject area and goals. For another, how you collect... Continue Reading
Design of Experiments (DOE) is the perfect tool to efficiently determine if key inputs are related to key outputs. Behind the scenes, DOE is simply a regression analysis. What’s not simple, however, is all of the choices you have to make when planning your experiment. What X’s should you test? What ranges should you select for your X’s? How many replicates should you use? Do you need center... Continue Reading
In my last post, we took the red pill and dove deep into the unarguably fascinating and uncompromisingly compelling world of the matrix plot. I've stuffed this post with information about a topic of marginal interest...the marginal plot. Margins are important. Back in my English composition days, I recall that margins were particularly prized for the inverse linear relationship they maintained with... Continue Reading
Suppose you’ve collected data on cycle time, revenue, the dimension of a manufactured part, or some other metric that’s important to you, and you want to see what other variables may be related to it. Now what? When I graduated from college with my first statistics degree, my diploma was bona fide proof that I'd endured hours and hours of classroom lectures on various statistical topics, including l... Continue Reading
For one reason or another, the response variable in a regression analysis might not satisfy one or more of the assumptions of ordinary least squares regression. The residuals might follow a skewed distribution or the residuals might curve as the predictions increase. A common solution when problems arise with the assumptions of ordinary least squares regression is to transform the response... Continue Reading
In my last post, I looked at viewership data for the five seasons of HBO’s hit series Game of Thrones. I created a time series plot in Minitab that showed how viewership rose season by season, and how it varied episode by episode within each season.   My next step is to fit a statistical model to the data, which I hope will allow me to predict the viewing numbers for future episodes.    I am going to... Continue Reading
In this post, I’ll address some common questions we’ve received in technical support about the difference between fitted and data means, where to find each option within Minitab, and how Minitab calculates each. First, let’s look at some definitions. It’s useful to have an example, so I’ll be using the Light Output data set from Minitab’s Data Set Library, which includes a description of the sample... Continue Reading
In the world of linear models, a hierarchical model contains all lower-order terms that comprise the higher-order terms that also appear in the model. For example, a model that includes the interaction term A*B*C is hierarchical if it includes these terms: A, B, C, A*B, A*C, and B*C. Fitting the correct regression model can be as much of an art as it is a science. Consequently, there's not always a... Continue Reading
How deeply has statistical content from Minitab blog posts (or other sources) seeped into your brain tissue? Rather than submit a biopsy specimen from your temporal lobe for analysis, take this short quiz to find out. Each question may have more than one correct answer. Good luck! Which of the following are famous figure skating pairs, and which are methods for testing whether your data follow a... Continue Reading
If you perform linear regression analysis, you might need to compare different regression lines to see if their constants and slope coefficients are different. Imagine there is an established relationship between X and Y. Now, suppose you want to determine whether that relationship has changed. Perhaps there is a new context, process, or some other qualitative change, and you want to determine... Continue Reading
With Speaker John Boehner resigning, Kevin McCarthy quitting before the vote for him to be Speaker, and a possible government shutdown in the works, the Freedom Caucus has certainly been in the news frequently! Depending on your political bent, the Freedom Caucus has caused quite a disruption for either good or bad.  Who are these politicians? The Freedom Caucus is a group of approximately 40... Continue Reading
Step 3 in our DOE problem solving methodology is to determine how many times to replicate the base experiment plan. The discussion in Part 3 ended with the conclusion that our 4 factors could best be studied using all 16 combinations of the high and low settings for each factor, a full factorial. Each golfer will perform half of the sixteen possible combinations and each golfer’s data could stand as... Continue Reading
Step 2 in our DOE problem-solving methodology is to design the data collection plan you will use to study the factors in your experiment. Of course, you will have to incorporate blocking and covariates in your experiment design, as well as calculate the number of replications of run conditions needed in order to be confident in your results. We will address these topics in future posts, but for... Continue Reading
If you use ordinary linear regression with a response of count data, if may work out fine (Part 1), or you may run into some problems (Part 2). Given that a count response could be problematic, why not use a regression procedure developed to handle a response of counts? A Poisson regression analysis is designed to analyze a regression model with a count response. First, let's try using Poisson... Continue Reading
My previous post showed an example of using ordinary linear regression to model a count response. For that particular count data, shown by the blue circles on the dot plot below, the model assumptions for linear regression were adequately satisfied. But frequently, count data may contain many values equal or close to 0. Also, the distribution of the counts may be right-skewed. In the quality field,... Continue Reading
Ever use dental floss to cut soft cheese? Or Alka Seltzer to clean your toilet bowl? You can find a host of nonconventional uses for ordinary objects online. Some are more peculiar than others. Ever use ordinary linear regression to evaluate a response (outcome) variable of counts?  Technically, ordinary linear regression was designed to evaluate a a continuous response variable. A continuous... Continue Reading