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Measurement System Analysis

Blog posts and articles about performing Measurement System Analysis (MSA) to be sure you can trust your data.

In Parts 1 and 2 of this blog series, I wrote about how statistical inference uses data from a sample of individuals to reach conclusions about the whole population. That’s a very powerful tool, but you must check your assumptions when you make statistical inferences. Violating any of these assumptions can result in false positives or false negatives, thus invalidating your results.  The common... Continue Reading
This week we’re celebrating the annual Thanksgiving holiday in the United States, which is not only a good time to reflect on the things we’re grateful for, but it’s also a good time to stuff yourself with turkey, mashed potatoes, green bean casserole, and the usual suspects that find their way to the Thanksgiving table! While I’m of course very thankful for my family, friends, home, etc., I’m also... Continue Reading

7 Deadly Statistical Sins Even the Experts Make

Do you know how to avoid them?

Get the facts >
In Part 1 of this blog series, I wrote about how statistical inference uses data from a sample of individuals to reach conclusions about the whole population. That’s a very powerful tool, but you must check your assumptions when you make statistical inferences. Violating any of these assumptions can result in false positives or false negatives, thus invalidating your results.  The common data... Continue Reading
Statistical inference uses data from a sample of individuals to reach conclusions about the whole population. It’s a very powerful tool. But as the saying goes, “With great power comes great responsibility!” When attempting to make inferences from sample data, you must check your assumptions. Violating any of these assumptions can result in false positives or false negatives, thus invalidating... Continue Reading
The ultimate goal of most quality improvement projects is clear: reducing the number of defects, improving a response, or making a change that benefits your customers. We often want to jump right in and start gathering and analyzing data so we can solve the problems. Checking your measurement systems first, with methods like attribute agreement analysis or Gage R&R, may seem like a needless waste... Continue Reading
We hosted our first-ever Minitab Insights conference in September, and if you were among the attendees, you already know the caliber of the speakers and the value of the information they shared. Experts from a wide range of industries offered a lot of great lessons about how they use data analysis to improve business practices and solve a variety of problems. I blogged earlier about five key... Continue Reading
Today, September 16, is World Ozone Day. You don't hear much about the ozone layer any more. In fact, if you’re under 30, you might think this is just another trivial, obscure observance, along the lines of International Dot Day (yesterday) or National Apple Dumpling Day (tomorrow). But there’s a good reason that, almost 30 years ago, the United Nations designated today to as a day to raise... Continue Reading
Have you ever accidentally done statistics? Not all of us can (or would want to) be “stat nerds,” but the word “statistics” shouldn’t be scary. In fact, we all analyze things that happen to us every day. Sometimes we don’t realize that we are compiling data and analyzing it, but that’s exactly what we are doing. Yes, there are advanced statistical concepts that can be difficult to understand—but... Continue Reading
Earlier this month, PLOS.org published an article titled "Ten Simple Rules for Effective Statistical Practice." The 10 rules are good reading for anyone who draws conclusions and makes decisions based on data, whether you're trying to extend the boundaries of scientific knowledge or make good decisions for your business.  Carnegie Mellon University's Robert E. Kass and several co-authors devised... Continue Reading
You often hear the data being blamed when an analysis is not delivering the answers you wanted or expected. I was recently reminded that the data chosen or collected for a specific analysis is determined by the analyst, so there is no such thing as bad data—only bad analysis.  This made me think about the steps an analyst can take to minimise the risk of producing analysis that fails to answer... Continue Reading
The last thing you want to do when you purchase a new piece of software is spend an excessive amount of time getting up and running. You’ve probably been ready to the use the software since, well, yesterday. Minitab has always focused on making our software easy to use, but many professional software packages do have a steep learning curve. Whatever package you’re using, here are three things you... Continue Reading
Working with healthcare-related data often feels different than working with manufacturing data. After all, the common thread among healthcare quality improvement professionals is the motivation to preserve and improve the lives of patients. Whether collecting data on the number of patient falls, patient length-of-stay, bed unavailability, wait times, hospital acquired-infections, or readmissions,... Continue Reading
Most of us have heard a backwards way of completing a task, or doing something in the conventionally wrong order, described as “putting the cart before the horse.” That’s because a horse pulling a cart is much more efficient than a horse pushing a cart. This saying may be especially true in the world of statistics. Focusing on a statistical tool or analysis before checking out the condition of your... Continue Reading
When you analyze a Gage R&R study in statistical software, your results can be overwhelming. There are a lot of statistics listed in Minitab's Session Window—what do they all mean, and are they telling you the same thing? If you don't know where to start, it can be hard to figure out what the analysis is telling you, especially if your measurement system is giving you some numbers you'd think are... Continue Reading
While the roots of Lean Six Sigma and other quality improvement methodologies are in manufacturing, it’s interesting to see how other organizational functions and industries apply LSS tools successfully. Quality improvement certainly has moved far beyond the walls of manufacturing plants! For example, I recently had the opportunity to talk to Drew Mohler, a Lean Six Sigma black belt and senior... Continue Reading
If you follow the news in the United States then you’ve heard that there’s a water crisis in Flint, Michigan. Although there’s going to continue to be debate about how much ethics played a role in the data collection practices, it’s worthwhile to at least be ready to perform the correct analysis on the data when you have it. Here’s how you can use Minitab to be like a citizen data scientist... Continue Reading
Each year Santa’s Elves have to take all the information provided by family, friends and teachers to determine if all the children of the world have been “Naughty” or “Nice.” This is no small task, as according to the website www.santafaqs.com Santa delivers over 5 billion presents per year. Not only is it a large task in terms of size, but it is critical that the Elves have a consistent approach to... Continue Reading
By Matthew Barsalou, guest blogger A problem must be understood before it can be properly addressed. A thorough understanding of the problem is critical when performing a root cause analysis (RCA) and an RCA is necessary if an organization wants to implement corrective actions that truly address the root cause of the problem. An RCA may also be necessary for process improvement projects; it is... Continue Reading
By Matthew Barsalou, guest blogger Teaching process performance and capability studies is easier when actual process data is available for the student or trainee to practice with. As I have previously discussed at the Minitab Blog, a catapult can be used to generate data for a capability study. My last blog on using a catapult for this purspose was several years ago, so I would like to revisit... Continue Reading
Many of the things you need to monitor can be measured in a concrete, objective way, such as an item's weight or length. But, many important characteristics are more subjective, such as the collaborative culture of the workplace, or an individual's political outlook. A survey is an excellent way to measure these kinds of characteristics. To better understand a characteristic, a researcher asks... Continue Reading