P Value

Blog posts and articles about how to use and interpret the P Value statistic in quality improvement efforts.

Data mining can be helpful in the exploratory phase of an analysis. If you're in the early stages and you're just figuring out which predictors are potentially correlated with your response variable, data mining can help you identify candidates. However, there are problems associated with using data mining to select variables. In my previous post, we used data mining to settle on the following... Continue Reading
On the Minitab Blog, we’ve often discussed getting data into Minitab from Excel. Here's a small sampling, in case you currently have data in Excel: Minitab and Excel: Making the (Data) Connection Linking Minitab to Excel to Get Answers Fast 3 Tips for Importing Excel Data into Minitab But if your data is not in Excel to begin with, taking it into Excel to prepare it for entry into Minitab isn’t... Continue Reading

7 Deadly Statistical Sins Even the Experts Make

Do you know how to avoid them?

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I watched an old motorcycle flick from the 1960s the other night, and I was struck by the bikers' slang. They had a language all their own. Just like statisticians, whose manner of speaking often confounds those who aren't hep to the lingo of data analysis. It got me thinking...what if there were an all-statistician biker gang? Call them the Nulls Angels. Imagine them in their colors, tearing... Continue Reading
If you were among the 300 people who attended the first-ever Minitab Insights conference in September, you already know how powerful it was. Attendees learned how practitioners from a wide range of industries use data analysis to address a variety of problems, find solutions, and improve business practices. In the coming weeks and months, we will share more of the great insights and guidance shared... Continue Reading
True or false: When comparing a parameter for two sets of measurements, you should always use a hypothesis test to determine whether the difference is statistically significant. The answer? (drumroll...) True! ...and False! To understand this paradoxical answer, you need to keep in mind the difference between samples, populations, and descriptive and inferential statistics.  Descriptive Statistics and... Continue Reading
Data mining uses algorithms to explore correlations in data sets. An automated procedure sorts through large numbers of variables and includes them in the model based on statistical significance alone. No thought is given to whether the variables and the signs and magnitudes of their coefficients make theoretical sense. We tend to think of data mining in the context of big data, with its huge... Continue Reading
Today, September 16, is World Ozone Day. You don't hear much about the ozone layer any more. In fact, if you’re under 30, you might think this is just another trivial, obscure observance, along the lines of International Dot Day (yesterday) or National Apple Dumpling Day (tomorrow). But there’s a good reason that, almost 30 years ago, the United Nations designated today to as a day to raise... Continue Reading
You’ve performed multiple linear regression and have settled on a model which contains several predictor variables that are statistically significant. At this point, it’s common to ask, “Which variable is most important?” This question is more complicated than it first appears. For one thing, how you define “most important” often depends on your subject area and goals. For another, how you collect... Continue Reading
There may be huge potential benefits waiting in the data in your servers. These data may be used for many different purposes. Better data allows better decisions, of course. Banks, insurance firms, and telecom companies already own a large amount of data about their customers. These resources are useful for building a more personal relationship with each customer. Some organizations already use... Continue Reading
The college football season is here, and this raises a very important question: Is Alabama going to be undefeated when they win the national championship, or will they lose a regular-season game along the way? Okay, so it's not a given that Alabama is going to win the championship this year, but when you've won 4 of the last 7 you're definitely the odds-on favorite. However, what if we wanted to take... Continue Reading
In 2011 we had solar panels fitted on our property. In the last few months we have noticed a few problems with the inverter (the equipment that converts the electricity generated by the panels from DC to AC, and manages the transfer of unused electric to the power company). It was shutting down at various times throughout the day, typically when it was very sunny, resulting in no electricity being... Continue Reading
See if this sounds fair to you. I flip a coin. Heads: You win $1.Tails: You pay me $1. You may not like games of chance, but you have to admit it seems like a fair game. At least, assuming the coin is a normal, balanced coin, and assuming I’m not a sleight-of-hand magician who can control the coin. How about this next game? You pay me $2 to play.I flip a coin over and over until it comes up heads.Your... Continue Reading
I blogged a few months back about three different Minitab tools you can use to examine your data over time. Did you know you that you can also use a simple run chart to display how your process data changes over time? Of course those “changes” could be evidence of special-cause variation, which a run chart can help you see. What’s special-cause variation, and how’s it different from common-cause... Continue Reading
While some posts in our Minitab blog focus on understanding t-tests and t-distributions this post will focus more simply on how to hand-calculate the t-value for a one-sample t-test (and how to replicate the p-value that Minitab gives us).  The formulas used in this post are available within Minitab Statistical Software by choosing the following menu path: Help > Methods and Formulas > Basic... Continue Reading
Design of Experiments (DOE) is the perfect tool to efficiently determine if key inputs are related to key outputs. Behind the scenes, DOE is simply a regression analysis. What’s not simple, however, is all of the choices you have to make when planning your experiment. What X’s should you test? What ranges should you select for your X’s? How many replicates should you use? Do you need center... Continue Reading
In the great 1971 movie Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, the reclusive owner of the Wonka Chocolate Factory decides to place golden tickets in five of his famous chocolate bars, and allow the winners of each to visit his factory with a guest. Since restarting production after three years of silence, no one has come in or gone out of the factory. Needless to say, there is enormous interest in... Continue Reading
In my last post, we took the red pill and dove deep into the unarguably fascinating and uncompromisingly compelling world of the matrix plot. I've stuffed this post with information about a topic of marginal interest...the marginal plot. Margins are important. Back in my English composition days, I recall that margins were particularly prized for the inverse linear relationship they maintained with... Continue Reading
Time series data is proving to be very useful these days in a number of different industries. However, fitting a specific model is not always a straightforward process. It requires a good look at the series in question, and possibly trying several different models before identifying the best one. So how do we get there? In this post, I'll take a look at how we can examine our data and get a feel... Continue Reading
There may not be a situation more perilous than being a character on Game of Thrones. Warden of the North, Hand of the King, and apparent protagonist of the entire series? Off with your head before the end of the first season! Last male heir of a royal bloodline? Here, have a pot of molten gold poured on your head! Invited to a wedding? Well, you probably know what happens at weddings in the show. ... Continue Reading
In part 2 of this series, we used graphs and tables to see how individual factors affected rates of patient participation in a cardiac rehabilitation program. This initial look at the data indicated that ease of access to the hospital was a very important contributor to patient participation. Given this revelation, a bus or shuttle service for people who do not have cars might be a good way to... Continue Reading