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Pareto Charts

Blog posts and articles about creating and using the quality improvement tool known as a Pareto Chart.

Pareto charts are a special type of bar chart you can use to prioritize almost anything. This makes them very useful in making sound decisions. For example, if you have several possible quality improvement projects, but not enough time or people to do them all now, you can use a Pareto chart to identify which projects have the most potential for making meaningful improvement. Pareto charts look... Continue Reading
At the inaugural Minitab Insights Conference in September, presenters Benjamin Turcan and Jennifer Berner discussed how to present data effectively. Among the considerations they discussed was choosing the right graph. Different graphs are good for different things. Of course, opinions about which graph is best can, and do, differ. Dotplot devotees might decide that they are demonstrably... Continue Reading

7 Deadly Statistical Sins Even the Experts Make

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If your work involves quality improvement, you've at least heard of Design of Experiments (DOE). You probably know it's the most efficient way to optimize and improve your process. But many of us find DOE intimidating, especially if it's not a tool we use often. How do you select an appropriate design, and ensure you've got the right number of factors and levels? And after you've gathered your... Continue Reading
A reader asked a great question in response to a post I wrote about Pareto charts. Our readers typically do ask great questions, but this one turned out to be more difficult to answer than it first seemed. My correspondent wrote:  My understanding is that when you have count data, a bar chart is the way to go. The gaps between the bars emphasize that the data are not measured on a continuous scale.... Continue Reading
We’ve got a plethora of case studies showing how businesses from different industries solve problems and implement solutions with data analysis. Take a look for ideas about how you can use data analysis to ensure excellence at your business! Boston Scientific, one of the world’s leading developers of medical devices, is just one organization who has shared their story. A team at their Heredia,... Continue Reading
I confess: I'm not a natural-born decision-maker. Some people—my wife, for example—can assess even very complex situations, consider the options, and confidently choose a way forward. Me? I get anxious about deciding what to eat for lunch. So you can imagine what it used to be like when I needed to confront a really big decision or problem. My approach, to paraphrase the Byrds, was "Re:... Continue Reading
Design of Experiments is an extremely powerful statistical method, and we added a DOE tool to the Assistant in Minitab 17  to make it more accessible to more people. Since it's summer grilling season, I'm applying the Assistant's DOE tool to outdoor cooking. Earlier, I showed you how to set up a designed experiment that will let you optimize how you grill steaks.  If you're not already using it and... Continue Reading
What does the eyesight of a homeless person have in common with complications from dental anesthesia?  Or with reducing side-effects from cancer? Or monitoring artificial hip implants? These are all subjects of recently published studies that use statistical analyses in Minitab to improve healthcare outcomes. And they're a good reminder  that when we improve the quality of healthcare for others, we... Continue Reading
My previous post covered the initial phases of a project to attract and retain more patients in a cardiac rehabilitation program, as described in a 2011 Quality Engineering article. A Pareto chart of the reasons enrolled patients left the program indicated that the hospital could do little to encourage participants to attend a greater number of sessions, so the team focused on increasing initial... Continue Reading
Over the past year I've been able to work with and learn from practitioners and experts who are using data analysis and Six Sigma to improve the quality of healthcare, both in terms of operational efficiency and better patient outcomes. I've been struck by how frequently a very basic analysis can lead to remarkable improvements, but some insights cannot be attained without conducting more... Continue Reading
The Pareto chart is a graphic representation of the 80/20 rule, also known as the Pareto principle. If you're a quality improvement specialist, you know that the chart is named after the early 20th century economist Vilfredo Pareto, who discovered that roughly 20% of the population in Italy owned about 80% of the property at that time. You probably also know that the Pareto principle was... Continue Reading
In my last post, I discussed how a DOE was chosen to optimize a chemical-mechanical polishing process in the microelectronics industry. This important process improved the plant's final manufacturing yields. We selected an experimental design that let us study the effects of six process parameters in 16 runs. Analyzing the Design Now we'll examine the analysis of the DOE results after the actual... Continue Reading
You have a column of categorical data. Maybe it’s a column of reasons for production downtime, or customer survey responses, or all of the reasons airlines give for those riling flight delays. Whatever type of qualitative data you may have, suppose you want to find the most common categories. Here are three different ways to do that: 1. Pareto Charts Pareto Charts easily help you separate the vital... Continue Reading
People who are ill frequently need medication. But if they miss a dose, or receive the wrong medication—or even get the wrong dose of the right medication—the results can be disastrous.  So medical professionals have a lot at stake in making sure patients get the right medicine, in the right amount, at the right time. But hospitals and other medical facilities are complex systems, and mistakes do... Continue Reading
Whatever industry you're in, you're going to need to buy supplies. If you're a printer, you'll need to purchase inks, various types of printing equipment, and paper. If you're in manufacturing, you'll need to obtain parts that you don't make yourself.  But how do you know you're making the right choice when you have multiple suppliers vying to fulfill your orders?  How can you be sure you're... Continue Reading
Generally speaking, I have a problem with authority. I don’t like being told what to do or how to do it. I’m not proud of that. I recall debating with my High School Trigonometry teacher regarding the value of the homework “process.” Specifically, in those situations where the student in question did not require practice to get an A. And, if said student was getting a 98% on the exams, why spend... Continue Reading
My previous post focused on manipulating text data using Minitab’s calculator. In this post we continue to explore some of the useful tools for working with text data, and here we’ll focus on Minitab 17.2’s Data menu. This is the second in a 3-part series, and in the final post we’ll look at the new features in Minitab 17.2’s Editor menu. Using the Data Menu When I think of the Data menu, I think... Continue Reading
Forbes ranked the world’s billionaires for 2015 this week, which gives us a good opportunity to have fun with some data. After all, when you’re talking about billions, the most fun you can have is to see how big the number can get. If you copy and paste Forbes’ data directly, you’ll find it a bit messy for analysis. For example, the sources of wealth for the billionaires include Telcom, Telecom,... Continue Reading
I left off last with a post outlining how the Six Sigma students at Rose-Hulman were working on a project to reduce the amount of recycling thrown in the normal trash cans in all of the academic buildings at the institution. Using the DMAIC methodology for completing improvement projects, they had already defined the problem at hand: how could the amount of recycling that’s thrown in the normal trash... Continue Reading
Recently, Minitab’s Joel Smith posted about his vacation and being pooped on twice by birds. Then guest blogger Matthew Barsalou wrote a wonderful follow-up on the chances of Joel being pooped on a third time. While I cannot comment on how Joel has handled this situation psychologically so far, I can say that if I had been pooped on twice in a short amount of time, I would be wary of our... Continue Reading