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Project Tools

Blog posts and articles about tools and techniques that help keep Lean and Six Sigma projects on track.

Suppose you’ve collected data on cycle time, revenue, the dimension of a manufactured part, or some other metric that’s important to you, and you want to see what other variables may be related to it. Now what? When I graduated from college with my first statistics degree, my diploma was bona fide proof that I'd endured hours and hours of classroom lectures on various statistical topics, including l... Continue Reading
Over the past year I've been able to work with and learn from practitioners and experts who are using data analysis and Six Sigma to improve the quality of healthcare, both in terms of operational efficiency and better patient outcomes. I've been struck by how frequently a very basic analysis can lead to remarkable improvements, but some insights cannot be attained without conducting more... Continue Reading

7 Deadly Statistical Sins Even the Experts Make

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This is an era of massive data. A huge amount of data is being generated from the web and from customer relations records, not to mention also from sensors used in the manufacturing industry (semiconductor, pharmaceutical, petrochemical companies and many other industries). Univariate Control Charts In the manufacturing industry, critical product characteristics get routinely collected to ensure... Continue Reading
Do you recall my “putting the cart before the horse” analogy in part 1 of this blog series? The comparison is simple. We all, at times, put the cart before the horse in relatively innocuous ways, such as eating your dessert before you’ve eaten your dinner, or deciding what to wear before you’ve been invited to the party. But performing some tasks in the wrong order, such as running a statistical... Continue Reading
While many Six Sigma practitioners and other quality improvement professionals like to use the Fishbone diagram in Quality Companion for brainstorming because of its ease of use and integration with other Quality Companion tools, some Minitab users find an infrequent need for a Fishbone diagram. For the more casual user of the Fishbone diagram, Minitab has the right tool to get the job done. Minitab... Continue Reading
Among the most underutilized statistical tools in Minitab, and I think in general, are multivariate tools. Minitab offers a number of different multivariate tools, including principal component analysis, factor analysis, clustering, and more. In this post, my goal is to give you a better understanding of the multivariate tool called discriminant analysis, and how it can be used. Discriminant... Continue Reading
by Laerte de Araujo Lima, guest blogger The NBA's 2015-16 season will be one for the history books. Not only was it the last season of Kobe Bryan, who scored 60 points in his final game, but the Golden State Warriors set a new wins record, beating the previous record set by 1995-96 Chicago Bulls. The Warriors seem likely to take this season's NBA title, in large part thanks to the performance of... Continue Reading
You can use contour plots, 3D scatterplots, and 3D surface plots in Minitab to view three variables in a single plot. These graphs are ideal if you want to see how temperature and humidity affect the drying time of paint, or how horsepower and tire pressure affect a vehicle's fuel efficiency, for example. Ultimately, these three graphs are good choices for helping you to visualize your data and exa... Continue Reading
The Pareto chart is a graphic representation of the 80/20 rule, also known as the Pareto principle. If you're a quality improvement specialist, you know that the chart is named after the early 20th century economist Vilfredo Pareto, who discovered that roughly 20% of the population in Italy owned about 80% of the property at that time. You probably also know that the Pareto principle was... Continue Reading
In the first part of this series, we looked at a case study where staff at a hospital used ATP swab tests to test 8 surfaces for bacteria in 10 different hospital rooms across 5 departments. ATP measurements below 400 units pass the swab test, while measurements greater than or equal to 400 units fail the swab test and require further investigation. I offered two tips on exploring and visualizing... Continue Reading
Working with healthcare-related data often feels different than working with manufacturing data. After all, the common thread among healthcare quality improvement professionals is the motivation to preserve and improve the lives of patients. Whether collecting data on the number of patient falls, patient length-of-stay, bed unavailability, wait times, hospital acquired-infections, or readmissions,... Continue Reading
We often receive questions about moving ranges because they're used in various tools in our statistical software, including control charts and capability analysis when data is not collected in subgroups. In this post, I'll explain what a moving range is, and how a moving range and average moving range are calculated. A moving range measures how variation changes over time when data are collected as... Continue Reading
As a recent graduate from Arizona State University with a degree in Business Statistics, I had the opportunity to work with students from different areas of study and help analyze data from various projects for them. One particular group asked for help analyzing online survey data they had gathered from other students, and they wanted to see if their new student program was beneficial. I would... Continue Reading
Depending on how often and when you use statistical software like Minitab, there may be specific tools or a group of tools you find yourself using over and over again. You may have to do a monthly report, for instance, for which you use one tool in our Basic Statistics menu, another in Quality Tools, and a third in Regression.  But there are a lot of functions and capabilities in our software, and... Continue Reading
Did you know that Minitab provides several tools you can use to view patterns in data over time? If you want to examine, say, monthly sales for your company, or even how the number of patients admitted to your hospital changes throughout the year, then these tools are for you! 1. Time Series Plot Time series plots are often used to examine daily, weekly, seasonal or annual variations, or... Continue Reading
Most of us have heard a backwards way of completing a task, or doing something in the conventionally wrong order, described as “putting the cart before the horse.” That’s because a horse pulling a cart is much more efficient than a horse pushing a cart. This saying may be especially true in the world of statistics. Focusing on a statistical tool or analysis before checking out the condition of your... Continue Reading
In my last post, I discussed how a DOE was chosen to optimize a chemical-mechanical polishing process in the microelectronics industry. This important process improved the plant's final manufacturing yields. We selected an experimental design that let us study the effects of six process parameters in 16 runs. Analyzing the Design Now we'll examine the analysis of the DOE results after the actual... Continue Reading
I used to work in the manufacturing industry. Some processes were so complex that even a very experienced and competent engineer would not necessarily know how to identify the best settings for the manufacturing equipment. You could make a guess using a general idea of what should be done regarding the optimal settings, but that was not sufficient. You need very precise indications of the correct... Continue Reading
P values have been around for nearly a century and they’ve been the subject of criticism since their origins. In recent years, the debate over P values has risen to a fever pitch. In particular, there are serious fears that P values are misused to such an extent that it has actually damaged science. In March 2016, spurred on by the growing concerns, the American Statistical Association (ASA) did... Continue Reading