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Regression Analysis

Blog posts and articles about regression analysis methods applied to Lean and Six Sigma projects.

Statisticians say the darndest things. At least, that's how it can seem if you're not well-versed in statistics.  When I began studying statistics, I approached it as a language. I quickly noticed that compared to other disciplines, statistics has some unique problems with terminology, problems that don't affect most scientific and academic specialties.  For example, dairy science has a highly... Continue Reading
Just 100 years ago, very few statistical tools were available and the field was largely unknown. Since then, there has been an explosion of tools available, as well as ever-increasing awareness and use of statistics.   While most readers of the Minitab Blog are looking to pick up new tools or improve their use of commonly-applied ones, I thought it would be worth stepping back and talking about one... Continue Reading
Previously, I’ve written about how to interpret regression coefficients and their individual P values. I’ve also written about how to interpret R-squared to assess the strength of the relationship between your model and the response variable. Recently I've been asked, how does the F-test of the overall significance and its P value fit in with these other statistics? That’s the topic of this post! In... Continue Reading
In my previous post, I showed you that the coefficients are different when choosing (-1,0,1) vs (1,0) coding schemes for General Linear Model (or Regression).  We used the two different equations to calculate the same fitted values. Here I will focus on showing what the different coefficients represent.  Let's use the data and models from the last blog post: We can display the means for each level... Continue Reading
Since Minitab 17 Statistical Software launched in February 2014, we've gotten great feedback from many people have been using the General Linear Model and Regression tools. But in speaking with people as part of Minitab's Technical Support team, I've found many are noticing that there are two coding schemes available with each. We frequently get calls from people asking how the coding scheme you... Continue Reading
If you’ve checked out What’s New in Minitab 17, you’ve had the chance to see that Conditional Formatting leads the list. If you’ve been reading the Minitab blog, you’ve had the chance to see demonstrations with Marvel’s Avengers and the Human Development Index. But you might not have had a chance to see that you can highlight large standardized residuals from a regression model and that the... Continue Reading
In previous posts, I discussed the results of a recycling project done by Six Sigma students at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology last spring. (If you’re playing catch up, you can read Part I and Part II.) The students did an awesome job reducing the amount of recycling that was thrown into the normal trash cans across all of the institution’s academic buildings. At the end of the spring... Continue Reading
By Erwin Gijzen, Guest Blogger In my previous post, we assessed the out-of-spec level for a process with capability analysis and visualized process variability using a control chart. Our goal is to reduce variability, but when a process has a multitude of categorical and continuous variables, identifying root causes can be a huge challenge. Analyzing covariance—using the statistical technique... Continue Reading
by Erwin Gijzen, Guest Blogger People who work in quality improvement know that the root causes of quality issues are hard to find. A typical production process can contain hundreds of potential causes. Additionally, companies often produce products with multiple quality requirements, such as dimensions, surface appearance, and impact resistance. With so many variables, it’s no wonder many companies... Continue Reading
This week I'm at the American Society for Quality's World Conference on Quality and Improvement in Nashville, TN. The ASQ conference is a great opportunity to see how quality professionals are tackling problems in every industry, from beverage distribution to banking services.  Given my statistical bent, I like to see how companies apply tools like ANOVA, regression, and especially... Continue Reading
Banned! In February 2015, editor David Trafimow and associate editor Michael Marks of the Journal of Basic and Applied Social Psychology declared that the null hypothesis statistical testing procedure is invalid. They promptly banned P values, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing from the journal. The journal now requires descriptive statistics and effect sizes. They also encourage large... Continue Reading
As a Minitab trainer, one of the most common questions I get from training participants is "what should I do when my data isn’t normal?" A large number of statistical tests are based on the assumption of normality, so not having data that is normally distributed typically instills a lot of fear. Many practitioners suggest that if your data are not normal, you should do a nonparametric version of... Continue Reading
A few times a year, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) publishes a Spotlight on Statistics Article. The first such article of 2015 recently arrived, providing analysis of trends in long-term unemployment.  Certainly an interesting read on its own, but some of the included data gives us a good opportunity to look at how thought can improve your regression analysis. Fortunately, Minitab Statistical... Continue Reading
In this series of posts, I show how hypothesis tests and confidence intervals work by focusing on concepts and graphs rather than equations and numbers.   Previously, I used graphs to show what statistical significance really means. In this post, I’ll explain both confidence intervals and confidence levels, and how they’re closely related to P values and significance levels. How to Correctly... Continue Reading
Imagine that you are watching a race and that you are located close to the finish line. When the first and fastest runners complete the race, the differences in times between them will probably be quite small. Now wait until the last runners arrive and consider their finishing times. For these slowest runners, the differences in completion times will be extremely large. This is due to the fact that... Continue Reading
We’ve been pretty excited about March Madness here at Minitab. Kevin Rudy’s been busy creating his regression model and predicting the winners for the 2015 NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament. But we’re not the only ones. Lots of folks are doing their best analysis to help you plan out your bracket now that the tip-offs for the round of 64 are just a day away. As you ponder your last-minute changes,... Continue Reading
The NCAA Tournament is right around the corner, and you know what that means: It’s time to start thinking about how you’re going to fill out your bracket! For the last two years I’ve used the Sagarin Predictor Ratings to predict the tournament. However, there is a problem with that strategy this year. The old method uses a regression model that calculates the probability one team has of beating... Continue Reading
In England, with only a few months left, the Barclay’s Premier League is about to enter the final run in to finish up the season. While the top two spots seem pretty locked up with Chelsea and Manchester City showing their class, the fight for the other two spots in the coveted top 4 promises to entertain to the very last weekend. This is key, because only the top 4 finishers qualify for next... Continue Reading
by Lion "Ari" Ondiappan Arivazhagan, guest blogger.  An alarming number of borewell accidents, especially involving little children, have occurred across India in the recent past. This is the second of a series of articles on Borewell accidents in India. In the first installment of the series, I used the G-chart in Minitab Statistical Software to predict the probabilities of innocent children... Continue Reading
In part 1 of this post, I covered how Six Sigma students at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology cleaned up and prepared project data for a regression analysis. Now we're ready to start our analysis. We’ll detail the steps in that process and what we can learn from our results. What Factors Are Important? We collected data about 11 factors we believe could be significant: Whether the date of... Continue Reading