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Guest Blogger

Blog posts from people who are applying statistics and data analysis to their quality improvement projects and personal interests. Would you like to submit a post? Contact publicrelations(at)minitab.com 

By Peter Olejnik, guest blogger. Previous posts on the Minitab Blog have discussed the work of the Six Sigma students at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology to reduce the quantities of recyclables that wind up in the trash. Led by Dr. Diane Evans, these students continue to make an important impact on their community. As with any Six Sigma process, the results of the work need to be evaluated. A... Continue Reading
by Matthew Barsalou, guest blogger.  E. E. Doc Smith, one of the greatest authors ever, wrote many classic books such as The Skylark of Space and his Lensman series. Doc Smith’s imagination knew no limits; his Galactic Patrol had millions of combat fleets under its command and possessed planets turned into movable, armored weapons platforms. Some of the Galactic Patrol’s weapons may be well... Continue Reading

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by Matthew Barsalou, guest blogger Recently Minitab’s Joel Smith posted a blog about an incident in which he was pooped on by a bird. Twice. I suspect many people would assume the odds of it happening twice are very low, so they would incorrectly assume they are safer after such a rare event happens. I don’t have data on how often birds poop on one person, and I assume Joel is unwilling to stand... Continue Reading
by Matthew Barsalou, guest blogger Aaron and Billy are two very competitive—and not always well-behaved—eight-year-old twin brothers. They constantly strive to outdo each other, no matter what the subject. If the boys are given a piece of pie for dessert, they each automatically want to make sure that their own piece of pie is bigger than the other’s piece of pie. This causes much exasperation,... Continue Reading
by Jasmin Wong, guest blogger   Part 1 of this two-part blog post discusses the issues and challenges in injection moulding and suggests using simulation software and the statistical method called Design of Experiments (DOE) to speed development and boost quality. This part presents a case study that illustrates this approach.  Preliminary Fill and Designed Experiment This case study considers the... Continue Reading
by Jasmin Wong, guest blogger The combination of statistical methods and injection moulding simulation software gives manufacturers a powerful way to predict moulding defects and to develop a robust moulding process at the part design phase.  CAE (computer-aided engineering) is widely used in the injection moulding industry today to improve product and mould designs as well as to resolve or... Continue Reading
by The Discrete Sharer, guest blogger As Minitab users, many of us have found staged control charts to be an effective tool to quantify and demonstrate the “before and after” state of our process improvement activities. However, have you ever considered using them to demonstrate the effects of changes to compensation/incentive plans for your employees?  Here's an example of how a mid-sized... Continue Reading
by Lion "Ari" Ondiappan Arivazhagan, guest blogger In India, we've seen this story far too many times in recent years: Timmanna Hatti, a six-year old boy, was trapped in a 160-feet borewell for more than 5 days in Sulikeri village of Bagalkot district in Karnataka after falling into the well. Perhaps the most heartbreaking aspect of the situation was the decision of the Bagalkot district... Continue Reading
by Iván Alfonso, guest blogger I'm a huge fan of hot cakes—they are my favorite dessert ever. I’ve been cooking them for over 15 years, and over that time I’ve noticed many variation in textures, flavor, and thickness. Personally, I like fluffy pancakes. There are many brands of hotcake mix on the market, all with very similar formulations. So I decided to investigate which ingredients and inputs... Continue Reading
by Matthew Barsalou, guest blogger  I told a friend about my interest in statistics, and he immediately told me a joke about broiled chicken and statistics. The punch line involved my friend getting to eat all the chicken. Unfortunately, I forgot the rest of the joke. I can, however, assure you it was a very funny statistics-related joke. People often make jokes when I mention my interest... Continue Reading
by Matthew Barsalou, guest blogger Programs such as the Minitab Statistical Software make hypothesis testing easier; but no program can think for the experimenter. Anybody performing a statistical hypothesis test must understand what p values mean in regards to their statistical results as well as potential limitations of statistical hypothesis testing. A p value of 0.05 is frequently used during... Continue Reading
by Laerte de Araujo Lima, guest blogger In a previous post (How Data Analysis Can Help Us Predict This Year's Champions League), I shared how I used Minitab Statistical Softwareto predict the 2013-2014 season of the UEFA Champions league. This involved the regression analysis of main critical-to-quality (CTQ) factors, which I identified using the “voice of the customer” suggestions of some... Continue Reading
by Matthew Barsalou, guest blogger I recently moved, and right after finishing the less-than-joyous task of unpacking I decided to take and break and relax by playing with Minitab Statistical Software.   As a data source I used the many quotes I received from moving companies. I'd invited many companies to look around my previous home, and then they would provide me an estimate with the price... Continue Reading
by Arun Kumar, guest blogger One of the most commonly used statistical methods is ANOVA, short for “Analysis of Variance.” Whether you’re analysing data for Six-Sigma styled quality improvement projects, or perhaps just taking your first statistics course, a good understanding of how this technique works is important. A lot of concepts are involved in any analysis using ANOVA and its subsequent... Continue Reading
by Laerte de Araujo Lima, guest blogger A few weeks ago, my football friends and I were talking about the football in the UEFA Champions league (UEFA CL), and what we could expect for the 2013-14 season. Some of us believe that the quality of the football played in the UEFA CL has improved in the last few years, as evidenced by more goals per match, more teams with strategies based in the attack... Continue Reading
by Matthew Barsalou, guest blogger The field of statistics has a long history and many people have made contributions over the years. Many contributors to the field were educated as statisticians, such as Karl Pearson and his son Egon Pearson. Others were people with problems that needed solving, and they developed statistical methods to solve these problems. The Standard Normal Distribution One... Continue Reading
by Jeff Parks, guest blogger Being a Cincinnati Bengals fan is tough. It's true that Bengals fans don't have it as bad as, say, long-suffering Chicago Cubs fans...nevertheless, the Bengals haven’t won a playoff game since January 1991. That's currently the longest streak in the NFL. In the 1990s they were voted the worst sports franchise by ESPN. Not the worst football team, mind you, but the worst... Continue Reading
by Cory Heid, guest blogger A few months ago I posted a blog about Tootsie Pops and how many licks it takes to get to the Tootsie Roll center. If you haven’t read the post, here's a quick summary. Recap of Initial Study I broke down my experiment into four parts where I would test: the force of a lick temperature of a person's mouth pH level of a person's saliva the solubility of a person's saliva After... Continue Reading
by Matthew Barsalou, guest blogger In the 1935 book The Design of Experiments, Ronald A. Fisher used the example of a lady tasting tea to demonstrate basic principles of statistical experiments. In Fisher’s example, a lady made the claim that she could taste whether milk or tea was poured first into her cup, so Fisher did what any good statistician would do—he performed an experiment. The lady in... Continue Reading
by Matthew Barsalou, guest blogger A good way to begin researching a topic is with exploratory data analysis (EDA). In his 1977 book Exploratory Data Analysis, John Tukey suggested using EDA to collect and analyze data—not to confirm a hypothesis, but to form a hypothesis that could later be confirmed through other methods. In some cases, EDA can even eliminate the need for a more in-depth... Continue Reading