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Statistics

Blog posts and articles about statistical principles in quality improvement methods like Lean and Six Sigma.

Did you just go shopping for school supplies? If you did, you’ve participated in what’s become the second biggest spending season of the year in the United States, according to the National Retail Federation (NRF). The trends and analysis are so interesting to the NRF that they actually add questions about back-to-school shopping to two monthly consumer surveys. The two surveys have different... Continue Reading
by The Discrete Sharer, guest blogger As Minitab users, many of us have found staged control charts to be an effective tool to quantify and demonstrate the “before and after” state of our process improvement activities. However, have you ever considered using them to demonstrate the effects of changes to compensation/incentive plans for your employees?  Here's an example of how a mid-sized... Continue Reading
The 2014-15 NFL season is only days away, and fans all over the country are planning their fall weekends accordingly. In this post, I'm going to use data analysis to answer some questions related to ticket prices, such as: Which team is the least/most expensive to watch at home?  Which team is the least/most expensive to watch on the road?  If you are thinking of a road trip, which stadiums offer... Continue Reading
Screening experimental designs allow you to study a very large number of factors in a very limited number of runs. The objective is to focus on the few factors that have a real effect and eliminate the effects that are not significant. This is often the initial typical objective of any experimenter when a DOE (design of experiments) is performed. Table of Factorial Designs Consider the table below.... Continue Reading
If you’re already a strong user of Minitab Statistical Software, then you’re probably familiar with how to use bar charts to show means, medians, sums, and other statistics. Bar charts are excellent tools, but traditionally used when you want all of your categorical variables to have different sections on the chart. When you want to plot statistics with groups that flow directly from one category... Continue Reading
by Lion "Ari" Ondiappan Arivazhagan, guest blogger In India, we've seen this story far too many times in recent years: Timmanna Hatti, a six-year old boy, was trapped in a 160-feet borewell for more than 5 days in Sulikeri village of Bagalkot district in Karnataka after falling into the well. Perhaps the most heartbreaking aspect of the situation was the decision of the Bagalkot district... Continue Reading
Do you suffer from PAAA (Post-Analysis Assumption Angst)? You’re not alone. Checking the required assumptions for a statistical  analysis is critical. But if you don’t have a Ph.D. in statistics, it can feel more complicated and confusing than the primary analysis itself. How does the cuckoo egg data, a common sample data set often used to teach analysis of variance, satisfy the following formal... Continue Reading
Previously, we looked at how accurate fantasy football rankings were for quarterbacks and tight ends. We found out that rankings for quarterbacks were quite accurate, with most of the top-ranked quarterbacks in the preseason finishing in the top 5 at the end of the season. Tight end rankings had more variation, with 36% of the top 5 preseason tight ends (over the last 5 years) actually finishing... Continue Reading
I caught the end of Toy Story over the weekend, which is definitely one of my all-time favorite children’s movies. Now—unfortunately or fortunately—I can’t get Randy Newman's theme song,“You’ve Got a Friend in Me,” out of my head! It's also got me thinking about the nature of friendship, and how "best friends forever" are supposed to always be there when you need them. And, not to get too maudlin... Continue Reading
Choosing the right type of subgroup in a control chart is crucial. In a rational subgroup, the variability within a subgroup should encompass common causes, random, short-term variability and represent “normal,” “typical,” natural process variations, whereas differences between subgroups are useful to detect drifts in variability over time (due to “special” or “assignable” causes). Variation within... Continue Reading
Learning to ride a bike is a rite of passage for any kid, so much so that we even use the expression "taking the training wheels off" for all kinds of situations. We say it to mean that we are going to let someone perform an activity on their own after removing some safeguard, even though we know they will likely experience failures before becoming proficient at it. You see, riding a bike requires... Continue Reading
NOTE: This story will reveal how easy it can be to optimize settings using the statistical method called Design of Experiments, but it won't provide easy answers for making your own office coffee any better. After her team’s ultimatum about the wretched office coffee, Jill used the design-of-experiments (DOE) tool in Minitab 17’s Assistant to design and analyze a screening study. Jill now knew... Continue Reading
NOTE: This story reveals how easy it can be to identify important factors using the statistical method called Design of Experiments. It won't provide easy answers for making your own office's coffee any better, but it will show you how you can begin identifying the critical factors that contribute to its quality. At their weekly meeting, her team gave Jill an ultimatum: Make the coffee better. The... Continue Reading
Via Christi Health, the largest provider of healthcare in Kansas, operates a Center for Clinical Excellence that's made up of a team of quality practitioners, all who have Lean and Six Sigma training. I recently had the opportunity to talk with the team about the types of projects they're working on. I learned not only about the areas of patient care where they are targeting improvements, but about... Continue Reading
In his post yesterday, my colleague Jim Colton applied binary logistic regression to data on the current ebola virus outbreak in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone, and revealed that, horrific as it is, this outbreak actually appears to have a lower death rate than some earlier ones.  He didn't address the potential for a global ebola pandemic, but over the last few days more than enough leading... Continue Reading
The current Ebola outbreak in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone is making headlines around the world, and rightfully so: it's a frightening disease, and last week the World Health Organization reported its spread is outpacing their response. Nearly 900 of  the more than 1,600 people infected during this outbreak have died, including some leading medical professionals trying to stanch the... Continue Reading
by Iván Alfonso, guest blogger I'm a huge fan of hot cakes—they are my favorite dessert ever. I’ve been cooking them for over 15 years, and over that time I’ve noticed many variation in textures, flavor, and thickness. Personally, I like fluffy pancakes. There are many brands of hotcake mix on the market, all with very similar formulations. So I decided to investigate which ingredients and inputs... Continue Reading
If you teach statistics or quality statistics, you’re probably already familiar with the cuckoo egg data set. The common cuckoo has decided that raising baby chicks is a stressful, thankless job. It has better things to do than fill the screeching, gaping maws of cuckoo chicks, day in and day out. So the mother cuckoo lays her eggs in the nests of other bird species. If the cuckoo egg is similar... Continue Reading
The calendar just flipped to August, meaning it’s time to get ready for fantasy football season! As you prepare for your draft, you will no doubt be looking at all sorts of rankings. But when the season is over, do you ever go back and see how accurate those rankings were? And are rankings for some positions more accurate than others? Well that’s exactly what we’re going to find out! I went back... Continue Reading
Last time, we went over Bar Charts you could create from Counts of Unique Values. However, sometimes you want to convey more information than just simple counts. For example, you could have a number of parts from different models. The number of occurrences themselves don't offer much value, so you may want a chart displaying the means, sums, or even standard deviations of the different parts.... Continue Reading