T-Test Example

Blog posts and articles about testing hypotheses with the statistical method called the T-Test.

This past weekend in the Big Ten showed how being conservative on 4th down decisions can cost you a game. Ohio State punted on 4th and 1 three different times, while Penn State and Illinois both kicked field goals in the 4th quarter when they needed a touchdown to tie or take the lead. All three teams lost. Perhaps taking some advice from the 4th down calculator would have greatly benefited them! If... Continue Reading
Back when I was an undergrad in statistics, I unfortunately spent an entire semester of my life taking a class, diligently crunching numbers with my TI-82, before realizing 1) that I was actually in an Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) class, 2) why I would want to use such a tool in the first place, and 3) that ANOVA doesn’t necessarily tell you a thing about variances. Fortunately, I've had a lot more... Continue Reading
Control charts are a fantastic tool. These charts plot your process data to identify common cause and special cause variation. By identifying the different causes of variation, you can take action on your process without over-controlling it. Assessing the stability of a process can help you determine whether there is a problem and identify the source of the problem. Is the mean too high, too low,... Continue Reading
By Matthew Barsalou, guest blogger A problem must be understood before it can be properly addressed. A thorough understanding of the problem is critical when performing a root cause analysis (RCA) and an RCA is necessary if an organization wants to implement corrective actions that truly address the root cause of the problem. An RCA may also be necessary for process improvement projects; it is... Continue Reading
Since it's the Halloween season, I want to share how a classic horror film helped me get a handle on an extremely useful statistical distribution.  The film is based on John W. Campbell's classic novella "Who Goes There?", but I first became  familiar with it from John Carpenter's 1982 film The Thing.   In the film, researchers in the Antarctic encounter a predatory alien with a truly frightening... Continue Reading
In Part 5 of our series, we began the analysis of the experiment data by reviewing analysis of covariance and blocking variables, two key concepts in the design and interpretation of your results. The 250-yard marker at the Tussey Mountain Driving Range, one of the locations where we conducted our golf experiment. Some of the golfers drove their balls well beyond this 250-yard maker during a few of... Continue Reading
In Part 3 of our series, we decided to test our 4 experimental factors, Club Face Tilt, Ball Characteristics, Club Shaft Flexibility, and Tee Height in a full factorial design because of the many advantages of that data collection plan. In Part 4 we concluded that each golfer should replicate their half fraction of the full factorial 5 times in order to have a high enough power to detect... Continue Reading
Every single Big Ten team played a conference game this week, giving us the most 4th downs to analyze yet. Last week, 4 of the 6 games were decided by one possession. This week only 2 of the 7 games were decided by one possession, so let's see if the losing teams missed opportunities to keep the game close! But first, a quick refresher on what this is.  I've used Minitab Statistical Software to... Continue Reading
You've collected a bunch of data. It wasn't easy, but you did it. Yep, there it is, right there...just look at all those numbers, right there in neat columns and rows. Congratulations. I hate to ask...but what are you going to do with your data? If you're not sure precisely what to do with the data you've got, graphing it is a great way to get some valuable insight and direction. And a good graph to... Continue Reading
Step 1 in our DOE problem-solving methodology is to use process experts, literature, or past experiments to characterize the process and define the problem. Since I had little experience with golf myself, this was an important step for me. This is not an uncommon situation. Experiment designers often find themselves working on processes that they have little or no experience with. For example, a... Continue Reading
Repeated measures designs don’t fit our impression of a typical experiment in several key ways. When we think of an experiment, we often think of a design that has a clear distinction between the treatment and control groups. Each subject is in one, and only one, of these non-overlapping groups. Subjects who are in a treatment group are exposed to only one type of treatment. This is the... Continue Reading
If you use ordinary linear regression with a response of count data, if may work out fine (Part 1), or you may run into some problems (Part 2). Given that a count response could be problematic, why not use a regression procedure developed to handle a response of counts? A Poisson regression analysis is designed to analyze a regression model with a count response. First, let's try using Poisson... Continue Reading
Ever use dental floss to cut soft cheese? Or Alka Seltzer to clean your toilet bowl? You can find a host of nonconventional uses for ordinary objects online. Some are more peculiar than others. Ever use ordinary linear regression to evaluate a response (outcome) variable of counts?  Technically, ordinary linear regression was designed to evaluate a a continuous response variable. A continuous... Continue Reading
In regression analysis, overfitting a model is a real problem. An overfit model can cause the regression coefficients, p-values, and R-squared to be misleading. In this post, I explain what an overfit model is and how to detect and avoid this problem. An overfit model is one that is too complicated for your data set. When this happens, the regression model becomes tailored to fit the quirks and... Continue Reading
Rare events inherently occur in all kinds of processes. In hospitals, there are medication errors, infections, patient falls, ventilator-associated pneumonias, and other rare, adverse events that cause prolonged hospital stays and increase healthcare costs.  But rare events happen in many other contexts, too. Software developers may need to track errors in lines of programming code, or a quality... Continue Reading
To make objective decisions about the processes that are critical to your organization, you often need to examine categorical data. You may know how to use a t-test or ANOVA when you’re comparing measurement data (like weight, length, revenue, and so on), but do you know how to compare attribute or counts data? It easy to do with statistical software like Minitab.  One person may look at this bar... Continue Reading
When we take pictures with a digital camera or smartphone, what the device really does is capture information in the form of binary code. At the most basic level, our precious photos are really just a bunch of 1s and 0s, but if we were to look at them that way, they'd be pretty unexciting. In its raw state, all that information the camera records is worthless. The 1s and 0s need to be converted... Continue Reading
When performing a design of experiments (DOE), some factor levels may be very difficult to change—for example, temperature changes for a furnace. Under these circumstances, completely randomizing the order in which tests are run becomes almost impossible.To minimize the number of factor level changes for a Hard-to-Change (HTC) factor, a split-plot design is required. Why Do We Want to Randomize a... Continue Reading
Statisticians say the darndest things. At least, that's how it can seem if you're not well-versed in statistics.  When I began studying statistics, I approached it as a language. I quickly noticed that compared to other disciplines, statistics has some unique problems with terminology, problems that don't affect most scientific and academic specialties.  For example, dairy science has a highly... Continue Reading
If you've read the first two parts of this tale, you know it started when I published a post that involved transforming data for capability analysis. When an astute reader asked why Minitab didn't seem to transform the data outside of the capability analysis, it revealed an oversight that invalidated the original analysis.  I removed the errant post. But to my surprise, the reader who helped me... Continue Reading