T-Test Example

Blog posts and articles about testing hypotheses with the statistical method called the T-Test.

Step 1 in our DOE problem-solving methodology is to use process experts, literature, or past experiments to characterize the process and define the problem. Since I had little experience with golf myself, this was an important step for me. This is not an uncommon situation. Experiment designers often find themselves working on processes that they have little or no experience with. For example, a... Continue Reading
Repeated measures designs don’t fit our impression of a typical experiment in several key ways. When we think of an experiment, we often think of a design that has a clear distinction between the treatment and control groups. Each subject is in one, and only one, of these non-overlapping groups. Subjects who are in a treatment group are exposed to only one type of treatment. This is the... Continue Reading
If you use ordinary linear regression with a response of count data, if may work out fine (Part 1), or you may run into some problems (Part 2). Given that a count response could be problematic, why not use a regression procedure developed to handle a response of counts? A Poisson regression analysis is designed to analyze a regression model with a count response. First, let's try using Poisson... Continue Reading
Ever use dental floss to cut soft cheese? Or Alka Seltzer to clean your toilet bowl? You can find a host of nonconventional uses for ordinary objects online. Some are more peculiar than others. Ever use ordinary linear regression to evaluate a response (outcome) variable of counts?  Technically, ordinary linear regression was designed to evaluate a a continuous response variable. A continuous... Continue Reading
In regression analysis, overfitting a model is a real problem. An overfit model can cause the regression coefficients, p-values, and R-squared to be misleading. In this post, I explain what an overfit model is and how to detect and avoid this problem. An overfit model is one that is too complicated for your data set. When this happens, the regression model becomes tailored to fit the quirks and... Continue Reading
Rare events inherently occur in all kinds of processes. In hospitals, there are medication errors, infections, patient falls, ventilator-associated pneumonias, and other rare, adverse events that cause prolonged hospital stays and increase healthcare costs.  But rare events happen in many other contexts, too. Software developers may need to track errors in lines of programming code, or a quality... Continue Reading
To make objective decisions about the processes that are critical to your organization, you often need to examine categorical data. You may know how to use a t-test or ANOVA when you’re comparing measurement data (like weight, length, revenue, and so on), but do you know how to compare attribute or counts data? It easy to do with statistical software like Minitab.  One person may look at this bar... Continue Reading
When we take pictures with a digital camera or smartphone, what the device really does is capture information in the form of binary code. At the most basic level, our precious photos are really just a bunch of 1s and 0s, but if we were to look at them that way, they'd be pretty unexciting. In its raw state, all that information the camera records is worthless. The 1s and 0s need to be converted... Continue Reading
When performing a design of experiments (DOE), some factor levels may be very difficult to change—for example, temperature changes for a furnace. Under these circumstances, completely randomizing the order in which tests are run becomes almost impossible.To minimize the number of factor level changes for a Hard-to-Change (HTC) factor, a split-plot design is required. Why Do We Want to Randomize a... Continue Reading
Statisticians say the darndest things. At least, that's how it can seem if you're not well-versed in statistics.  When I began studying statistics, I approached it as a language. I quickly noticed that compared to other disciplines, statistics has some unique problems with terminology, problems that don't affect most scientific and academic specialties.  For example, dairy science has a highly... Continue Reading
If you've read the first two parts of this tale, you know it started when I published a post that involved transforming data for capability analysis. When an astute reader asked why Minitab didn't seem to transform the data outside of the capability analysis, it revealed an oversight that invalidated the original analysis.  I removed the errant post. But to my surprise, the reader who helped me... Continue Reading
By Matthew Barsalou, guest blogger.   Many statistical tests assume the data being tested came from a normal distribution. Violating the assumption of normality can result in incorrect conclusions. For example, a Z test may indicate a new process is more efficient than an older process when this is not true. This could result in a capital investment for equipment that actually results in higher... Continue Reading
Before I joined Minitab, I worked for many years in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences as a writer and editor. I frequently wrote about food science and particularly food safety, as I regularly needed to report on the research being conducted by Penn State's food safety experts, and also edited course materials and bulletins for professionals and consumers about ensuring they had safe... Continue Reading
Previously, I’ve written about how to interpret regression coefficients and their individual P values. I’ve also written about how to interpret R-squared to assess the strength of the relationship between your model and the response variable. Recently I've been asked, how does the F-test of the overall significance and its P value fit in with these other statistics? That’s the topic of this post! In... Continue Reading
I recently fielded an interesting question about the probability and survival plots in Minitab Statistical Software's Reliability/Survival menus: Is there a one-to-one match between the confidence interval points on a probability plot and the confidence interval points on survival plot at a specific percentile? Now, this may seem like an easy question, given that the probabilities on a survival plot... Continue Reading
Scientists who use the Hubble Space Telescope to explore the galaxy receive a stream of digitized images in the form binary code. In this state, the information is essentially worthless- these 1s and 0s must first be converted into pictures before the scientists can learn anything from them. The same is true of statistical distributions and parameters that are used to describe sample data. They... Continue Reading
  The NFL recently announced that after scoring a touchdown, teams will be required to kick the extra point from the 15 yard line as opposed to the 2 yard line. This is a pretty big change. And whether you’re trying to improve the quality of your process, or simply trying to make a sporting event more exciting, it’s always good to know what kind of effects your change will have. So I’m going to use... Continue Reading
Earlier, I wrote about the different types of data statisticians typically encounter. In this post, we're going to look at why, when given a choice in the matter, we prefer to analyze continuous data rather than categorical/attribute or discrete data.  As a reminder, when we assign something to a group or give it a name, we have created attribute or categorical data.  If we count something, like... Continue Reading
In my previous post, I wrote about the hypothesis testing ban in the Journal of Basic and Applied Social Psychology. I showed how P values and confidence intervals provide important information that descriptive statistics alone don’t provide. In this post, I'll cover the editors’ concerns about hypothesis testing and how to avoid the problems they describe. The editors describe hypothesis testing... Continue Reading
Banned! In February 2015, editor David Trafimow and associate editor Michael Marks of the Journal of Basic and Applied Social Psychology declared that the null hypothesis statistical testing procedure is invalid. They promptly banned P values, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing from the journal. The journal now requires descriptive statistics and effect sizes. They also encourage large... Continue Reading